Malina: The Sun Sister
Malina: The Sun Sister
Anningan: The Moon Brother
Anningan: The Moon Brother
Malina and Anningan.
Malina and Anningan

Upon entering Dr. Maxine Merlino Gallery, I was amazed with Jamie Strassenburg’s Inuit Mythos. Inuit Mythos are stories of Native American Eskimo Mythology.  I will be talking about the story of Malina, which includes the story of Anningan. Malina and Anningan are both connected because they are the main character in the story. That is why in one of the illustrations they are together. All of Jamie’s Inuit Mythos illustrations were created through using illustrator and most of it was from Photoshop. The colors are a fuse of light and dark. Light colors, such as yellow, orange and pink, represent day. Dark colors, such as, black, grey, and purple represent the night.

Jamie explained, that Malina, once a mortal woman, is chased by her brother Anningan. Anningan always had eyes for his sister, and one night when she was sleeping unguarded, he crept into her dark room and began to violate her. Malina, while trying to escape, throws thick black soot at her attacker and grabs the brightest candle she can find. As she turns to see who her attacker is, and she is astonished to see that it is Anningan. Angered, she grabs a harpoon blade, cuts off her breasts, and throws them at Anningan. Malina screamed “You want me so much brother? There, take me,” and runs away. Annigan, shocked that he was discovered, grabs a dim candle,since Malina’s exit blew most of the flames out, and chases after her. Malina’s and her candle represent the sun. Through her bright light, she is able to give all sources of life on Earth the ability to thrive. Anningan and his candle represent the moon. His dim light lights the night sky, and the soot on his body represent the moon’s craters. The concept of this story is to explain night and day, and how the moon always follows the sun: Anningan chasing Malina. To learn more about Jamie’s Eskimo Myths pieces; or, to see more of Jamie’s other illustrations, check out her website at JamineDraws.

When first looking at Malin and Annigan in the same picture, I knew that there had something to do with light and darkness. Malina’s feathers and light did remind me of the sun, but I wasn’t sure. I also thought that it had something to do with good and evil, but I was wrong. Now that I know Malina’s tragic story, and Anningan’s part in it, I can connect the story with what I see when I look and the sun and the moon.

Advertisements